Clearly things have come on a long way since the last Viva rolled off the production line in 1979, after a sixteen-year run. Chevettes and Astras were then the way forward, but there's now space at the foot of Vauxhall's range for the Viva to be reborn as a five-door citycar. Let's take a look at what's in store.
The Viva has been built around Vauxhall's latest 1.0-litre three-cylinder petrol engine. In this guise, it makes 75PS worth of power, which is probably about adequate for a citycar. More engines may be announced in time, but the powerplant requirements for a small city scoot like this are usually quite simple. Models of this sort don't cover enough miles for a diesel engine to be worth fitting and lighter is better if you want the sort of jinky manoeuvrability delivered by the best urban runabouts.

This ECOTEC 1.0-litre engine drives the front wheels via a five-speed manual gearbox and the suspension and steering has been optimised for comfort on the sort of pock-marked streets that typify most British cities. Like its bigger brother, the Adam, the Viva gets a 'City' mode that lightens the steering even further to help take the effort out of parking.
Vauxhall's previous citycar offering, the Agila, was a model that never really got the credit it deserved, but the Viva looks set to do better. The styling is neat and assured, with none of the overtly cutesy flourishes that make certain small cars very gender specific. The Viva could well appeal to lads as well as lasses, with its purposeful front end, signature Z-slash that runs through the door handles in the side swage line, plus some neat alloy wheel designs. It's available in ten exterior paint colours with a variety of 14- to 16-inch wheel choices. Designed by Mark Adams' team in Europe, the Viva is built at GM Korea's plant in Changwon and is a sister car to the new generation Chevrolet Spark model that Britain now won't get.


Read more: http://www.middevongazette.co.uk/Viv...#ixzz3ZY5VtutR